Author Archives: William L. Andersen, Esq.

The Fair Credit Reporting Act

This article provides a high level overview of the The Fair Credit Reporting Act, including its statutory authority and the goals of the Act.  The article examines what steps a furnisher of information, like a bank, credit union, or credit … Read Full Post

CATEGORY: Florida Business Litigation Blog Practice Areas: , , ,

How OSHA Calculates Penalties

When OSHA issues a citation to employers for a workplace safety violation, the citation lists a proposed penalty. Much like a speeding ticket, the employer is not required to pay the penalty immediately and can contest the citation on a … Read Full Post

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New Florida Statute Provides Lenders With A Remedy In A Foreclosure Proceeding Against Borrowers Who Declare Bankruptcy

Effective October 2018, lenders have a new remedy in a foreclosure proceeding to expedite the final resolution of the proceeding.  Section 702.12, Florida Statutes creates a presumption in favor of the lender that the borrower waived any defense to a … Read Full Post

CATEGORY: Florida Business Litigation Blog Practice Areas: , ,

An Overview of Contesting OSHA Violations

An inspector from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (“OSHA”) just visited your premises and issued you, the employer, one or more citations detailing the nature of each violation committed and any associated penalties. You may be wondering what your options are to contest the citations and if there are any ways to reduce or completely eliminate the fines that may be associated with those citations. The procedure of formally contesting an OSHA citation is relatively straightforward, however if you do not abide by the strict deadlines associated with that procedure, you can lose the right to contest the citation, or worse the citation will become final and you will be forced to pay the penalty. As an employer who has received a citation, you may agree to the citation, correct the condition by the date set in the citation, and pay any penalty that is proposed, or you may send in writing a Notice of Intent to Contest of the citation, proposed penalty and/or the abatement date within fifteen (15) working days of receiving the citation. Read Full Post

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